CLA AND SOCIAL JUSTICE: BLACK LIVES MATTER

In light of the recent protests and statements in support of Black Lives Matter and other anti-racist organizing efforts, the College of Liberal Arts is highlighting how its courses incorporate issues related to Black Lives Matter. We will highlight one course each month.  You can view all of our courses here: https://cla.csulb.edu/black-lives-matter/

See the description below detailing how CLA faculty advance the anti-racist messaging of Black Lives Matter through assignments, readings, and pedagogical practices that affirm the lives, history, and culture of Black people across the globe. Descriptions fall into one of three categories—Long-Standing Practices, Recent Changes, and Future Plans—designed to demonstrate the ongoing nature of anti-racist efforts:

Instructor: Violet Gregory
Course: English 100B

I have always used readings that focus on the ways students of color move through the University, but this year I am working to better use my classroom as an ally to my community.

English 100B is a composition course, yet it also provides a space where all students can engage with texts, speeches, and other forms of art about people of color, by people of color. We investigate Malcom X’s journey to literacy, the rhetoric of Dr Martin Luther King’s speeches, and other works from the Black, Indigenous, and POC community.

Now, the connections between media, text, literature, and social justice are becoming more widely acknowledged. This interrelation between media and political change necessitates an understanding of intersectional identity. I work with my students to develop this nuanced view of race and identity in the U.S. while also improving their communication, and critical thinking skills.

During the scholar’s strike of Spring 2020 my students and I took the day to watch Baratunde Thurston’s 2009 TED talk “How to Deconstruct racism, one headline at a time.” Not only did this allow us to see and engage in complex conversations about race, racism, and the media; it also helped us create an understanding of systems of power embedded in language.

Thurston’s talk focuses on police brutality and the systematic disenfranchisement of the Black and POC communities at large. His research diagramed news headlines to parse the stories, and challenges us to look closely and power in these headlines in order to “change the action, which changes the story, which changes the system that allows those stories to happen.”

We then used Thurston’s still-growing database at baratunde.com/livingwhileblack to find local headlines that demonstrate this power struggle. The class investigated the rhetoric within those new stories to see who had power/authority/agency, and who was being silenced/misrepresented in the media coverage.

Uncovering these “unseen” structures of power in language then led to a larger intersectional research project that explored the University system where students explored how issues or race, class, culture, language, tradition, and identity make each student’s experience unique on our campus.

Graduate Student Spotlight: Emily Stoll – Master of Science, Industrial-Organizational Psychology

Emily Stoll just finished her first year of her Master of Science in Industrial/Organizational Psychology and will graduate in Spring 2022! She attended CSULB for her undergraduate program and got involved with the Psychology Resource Office (PRO), which provides students with internship, volunteer, career, and graduate school resources for Psychology students. Emily credits the “strong alumni network” that the Psychology department proves for students that helped her land a Talent Acquisition internship at Global, a 1st Flagship Company!

 

We are so proud of Emily and can’t wait to see what her future holds! Learn more about Emily, her plans for the future, and what advice she gives to students looking into graduate programs here at CSULB.

 

What made you choose CSULB for your Master’s degree?

 

I chose CSULB for my Master’s because I loved the environment and opportunities I was presented here as an undergraduate. The Psychology faculty create such a welcoming community with a wealth of resources and provide a strong alumni network to help students find employment after graduate school! 

 

What’s your favorite thing about your program?

 

My favorite thing about my program is that it pushes students to explore not only their educational interests but also outside opportunities such as research and internships. I also really enjoy the professors I have had, and my classmates. 

  

What are your future goals or career plans for life post-grad?

 

I plan to hopefully narrow down my interests in the coming months. My Talent Acquisition internship is providing me with exposure to recruiting and HR practices to give me a better idea of the direction I want to head in. Down the line I hope to go into consulting and organizational development. 

 

What’s your best advice for students looking into graduate school?

 

My best advice is to make sure you are aware of everything it takes to finish grad school. There are a lot of hurdles to go over so educate yourself on what those are so that you’re not blindsided. Also make sure that you are truly passionate about what you are going to school for, otherwise you will not have the motivation to push through on those difficult days. 

CLA AND SOCIAL JUSTICE: BLACK LIVES MATTER

In light of the recent protests and statements in support of Black Lives Matter and other anti

-racist organizing efforts, the College of Liberal Arts is highlighting how its courses incorporate issues related to Black Lives Matter. We will highlight one course each month.  You can view all of our courses here: https://cla.csulb.edu/black-lives-matter/

See the description below detailing how CLA faculty advance the anti-racist messaging of Black Lives Matter through assignments, readings, and pedagogical practices that affirm the lives, history, and culture of Black people across the globe. Descriptions fall into one of three categories—Long-Standing Practices, Recent Changes, and Future Plans—designed to demonstrate the ongoing nature of anti-racist efforts:

Recent Change

Instructor: Dr. Norbert Schürer
Course: ENGL 681R: Jane Austen

In the most recent version of ENGL 681R, I decided also to teach the novel fragment “Sanditon,” which Austen was working on when she died in 1817. While some scholars consider it problematic to teach a fragment (Austen only completed about one fifth of the novel), the text is remarkable because it has a mixed-race character. This character, a young “half mulatto” (Austen’s words), has a white father and a black mother. The novel (such as it exists) hardly deals with her racial status, but rather is develops ideas about her wealth. Various critics and students have interpreted this situation alternately as Austen being blind to race or Austen taking a progressive position in accepting the young woman regardless of her skin color. In the context of Black Lives Matters, it is important for students to discuss these issues and realize that even literature of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries can deal with race in nuanced ways.

The Cost of Free Shipping: Amazon in the Global Economy wins UALE Best Book Award

The book award committee for the United Association for Labor Education

(UALE) is pleased to announce that The Cost of Free Shipping: Amazon in the

Global Economy ed. by Jake Alimahomed-Wilson and Ellen Reese by Pluto

Books, has been chosen for the 2021 UALE Best Book Award 

Student Success Spotlight: Christopher Mardiroussian – Master of Arts, English with an emphasis in Rhetoric and Composition

Chris Mardiroussian is a graduate student at California State University, Long Beach. In 2018, he won First Prize in the Cinema Italian Style Film Festival (sponsored by the prestigious American Cinematheque in Los Angeles) for his short film entitled IL BREAKUP, which he co-wrote and produced. In 2017, he co-wrote a collection of poetry entitled HONESTY. LOVES. CRUELTY. His work has appeared in Bloom Magazine, BOMBFIRE, Ice Lolly Review, Soul Talk Magazine, Sunstroke Magazine, and elsewhere. He lives in Glendale, California

What’s the best advice you could give to incoming graduate students?

Graduate school can be intimidating to say the least. however, if there’s anything I’ve learned throughout my experience, it’s important to forge strong relationships with both your professors and peers. Your professors are available to hear any thoughts, concerns, and/or ideas that you may have; so, don’t be afraid to reach out to them because not only do they want you to succeed, but they certainly want to help you along the way and explore your interests in your field. Moreover, some of my fondest memories have come from peers that I’ve met and knowing that when at times I feel stressed and/or overwhelmed, we can have study groups, go to the coffee shop to vent, laugh with one another, or even speak on the phone with them. All in all, I’ve had the pleasure of having a supportive faculty and incredible group of peers that have made me feel part of the CSULB family. Without them, I would’ve felt lost, alone, and a needle in the haystack. At the end of the day, forging those connections with your faculty and peers will make navigating through graduate school a more insightful, meaningful, and sublime experience!

CLA Student Success Spotlight: Natalie Martz – Master of Arts, German

Natalie Martz graduated cum laude from CSULB in 2019 with BAs in History and German. She is the current President of the College of Liberal Arts Student Council and former President of the German Studies Student Association. Her awards and scholarships include the 2018-2019 CLA Distinguished Undergraduate Honor, the 2020 CLA Graduate Student Research Fellowship, and the 2021 CLA Dean’s List of Graduating Master’s Students. She has served as the student main organizer or co-organizer of three academic conferences at CSULB, worked as an editorial and research assistant for numerous articles and books, and interned at the Manuscripts Department of the German Literature Archive in Marbach am Neckar, Germany. In the fall of 2021, she will begin an M.Phil in History at Oxford University.

What’s the best advice you could give to incoming graduate students?

The best advice I could give to any student is to treat university as more than just a place to get a degree. It is an opportunity to become a more well-rounded and educated citizen of the world, and it is a privilege to which not everyone has access. Take the classes that interest you, even if they don’t fit on the “timely graduation schedule” or are outside of your degree requirements––you can accomplish both. Everyone else in your major has also taken those required classes; assert your individuality and feed your intellectual curiosity with something new that genuinely interests you, no matter how unrelated it may seem to your degree.

CLA AND SOCIAL JUSTICE: BLACK LIVES MATTER

In light of the recent protests and statements in support of Black Lives Matter and other anti-racist organizing efforts, the College of Liberal Arts is highlighting how its courses incorporate issues related to Black Lives Matter. We will highlight one course each month.  You can view all of our courses here: https://cla.csulb.edu/black-lives-matter/

See the description below detailing how CLA faculty advance the anti-racist messaging of Black Lives Matter through assignments, readings, and pedagogical practices that affirm the lives, history, and culture of Black people across the globe. Descriptions fall into one of three categories—Long-Standing Practices, Recent Changes, and Future Plans—designed to demonstrate the ongoing nature of anti-racist efforts:

Instructor: Dr. Kerry Woodward
Course: SOC 460: Poverty and Public Policy

 SOC 460: Poverty and Public Policy aims to show how white supremacist policies created the disproportionate poverty faced by Black communities and how racist discourses—and the policies that followed—further entrenched this poverty by promoting policing rather than investment in Black communities. Course readings show that anti-Black racism has been a primary historical and contemporary factor in reproducing economic inequality in the U.S., and in explaining our nation’s high rates of poverty and low levels of redistribution.

Students read The Color of Law: A Forgotten History of How Our Government Segregated America, by Richard Rothstein, to gain an understanding of the government’s role in the creation of poor Black neighborhoods, and wealthy white suburbs. Next semester, I plan to include parts of Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor’s 2019 book, Race for Profit: How Banks and the Real Estate Industry Undermined Black Homeownership, which explores the linkages between government policy and predatory real-estate practices.

Later in the course, we read Disciplining the Poor: Neoliberal Paternalism and the Persistent Power of Race, by Joe Soss, Richard Fording, and Sanford Schram, to explore the way racism has been a constitutive factor in shaping the anti-welfare, pro-policing policies of the past half century. As part of this unit, we also read a report from The Sentencing Project: Black Lives Matter: Eliminating Racial Inequity in the Criminal Justice System.

Throughout the semester, we read a wide variety of materials (including many policy reports) from a range of disciplines. Included in the required readings are works by many scholars of color, especially Black women, including: legal scholar Dorothy Roberts; historian Elizabeth Hinton; sociologist Alexes Harris; and welfare rights activist, Johnnie Tillmon. The course concludes with students finishing their final papers, where they research a social problem related to poverty and then analyze possible policy solutions. Issues related to racial justice—including everything from mass incarceration to immigrant rights to environmental injustice to the eviction crisis—are frequent topics.

Beach Forensics Concludes Season With A Splash

Beach Forensics concluded its competitive season by making a huge splash and winning a national championship! Team President Rebecca Cantor was crowned national champion at the National Online Forensics Championship in not one, but two events! Cantor placed first overall in the nation in After Dinner Speaking  and Persuasive Speaking, helping the team bring home a 4th place overall sweepstakes award to boot. This culminates an outstanding season for both Cantor and the team writ large, full of competition, growth, and success despite the limitations of distance learning. The team looks forward to finishing finals and then preparing for our upcoming season in the next academic year! GO BEACH!

CSULB Earns First Place in PRSSA’s 2021 Bateman Case Study Competition

JPR is ending the academic/pandemic year on a VERY high note—the CSULB JPR Bateman Team just won the premier national collegiate public relations case study competition!

More than 50 college teams from across the U.S. entered the competition and three finalists presented their campaigns to a panel of judges this morning.

The CSULB team is advised by Krista Coriaty. Student members include Samantha Troisi, David Rowe, Shani Crooks, Giselle Ormeno and Alyssa Canales.  Their “CivilityLB” campaign aimed to address incivility in public discourse, and it is incredible. Congratulations to Krista, Samantha, David, Shani, Giselle and Alyssa!

This is the second Bateman team victory for JPR in three years. Professor Coriaty also advised another winning Bateman team in 2019

To see the full press release:  https://www.prsa.org/news/2021/05/13/california-state-university-long-beach-earns-first-place-in-prssa-s-2021-bateman-case-study-competition

Congratulations Bateman Team!!!

Faculty Publications-Sociology-April/May 2021

Sociology

Barnes, Nielan. “Working within the Asylum Advocacy Nexus: Epistemological Strategies for LGBT Country Condition Expert Witnesses.” International Journal of Humanities and Social Science vol. 10, no. 11, Nov. 2020, pp. 11-22. doi:10.30845/ijhss.v10n11p2.
http://www.ijhssnet.com/view.php?u=http://www.ijhssnet.com/journals/Vol_10_No_11_November_2020/2.pdf

López, Claudia María. 2021. “Mateja Celestina, Living Displacement: The Loss and Making of Place in Colombia (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2018), Pp. Xxiii 177, £80.00.” Journal of Latin American Studies 53(1):195–97. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0022216X21000079

—. 2021. “The Urban Exclusion of Internally Displaced Peasants in Medellín, Colombia,” in Precarity and Belonging: Labor, Migration, and Noncitizenship., edited by C. Ramirez, S. Fálcon, S. McKay, J. Poblete, and F. Schaeffer. Rutgers University Press.
https://www.rutgersuniversitypress.org/precarity-and-belonging/9781978815629

—. 2019. “Contesting Double-Displacement: Internally Displaced Peasants and the Production of Borderlands Territory in Medellín, Colombia.” Geographica Helvetica 74 (3); 249–259. https://doi.org/10.5194/gh-74-249-2019

Foster, Holly & Chantrey J. Murphy. Forthcoming. “An Integrated Life Course Perspective on the Correlates and Influences of Maternal Efficacy among Imprisoned Latina, African American and White Women.” In Latinas in the Criminal Justice System: Victims, Targets and Offenders. Edited by Lisa Pasko and Vera Lopez. New York: NYU Press.

Sell, Jane, Katie Constantin, & Chantrey J. Murphy. 2020. “Reputation, Forgiveness, and Solving Problems of Cooperation.” Pp. 109-134 in Advances in Group Processes, Vol 37, edited by Shane R. Thye and Edward J. Lawler. Emerald Publishing Limited.

Hagan, John, Holly Foster, & Chantrey J. Murphy. 2020. “A Tale Half Told: State Exclusionary and Inclusionary Regimes, Incarceration of Fathers, and the Educational Attainment of Children.” Social Science Research 88-89: 1-19.

Osuna, Steven. (2021) “Securing Manifest Destiny: Mexico’s War on Drugs, Crisis of Legitimacy, and Global Capitalism,” Journal of World Systems Research, 21(1).

—. (2020) “Transnational Moral Panic: Neoliberalism and the Spectre of MS-13,” Race & Class, 61(4).

—. (2019) “The Psycho Realm Blues: The Violence of Policing, Disordering Practices, and Rap Criticism in Los Angeles,” Chiricú Journal: Latina/o Literatures, Arts, and Cultures, 4(1).

Patraporn, R. Varisa and Barbara W. Kim. Forthcoming. “Resurgent Ethnicity and Residential Choice among Second-Generation Asian Americans in a Los Angeles Panethnic Suburb” Urban Affairs Review.  

Patraporn, R. Varisa, Paul M. Ong and Chhandara Pech. 2021. “Wealth inequality in Asian American communities: The Continuing Significance of Ethnicity and Immigration” Asian American Policy Review 31:21-33.

Syeed, Esa. (2021). Putting Everything on the Table: Complexity, Context, and Community Engagement with Public EducationInterchange: A Quarterly Review of Education. Online First.
      
Noguera, P. & Syeed, E. (2020). City Schools and the American Dream 2: The Enduring Promise of Public Education. New York: Teachers College Press.

Alimahomed-Wilson, Jake. Forthcoming. “La révolution de la e-logistique: e-commerce, travail et retransformation de la chaîne d’approvisionnement de la Californie du Sud.” [English translation: “The E-Logistics Revolution: E-commerce, Labor, and the Re-transformation of the Southern California Supply Chain.”] Travail et Emploi.

—. Forthcoming. “The World is a Warehouse: Racialised Labour Regimes and the Rise of Amazon’s Global Logistics Empire.” Labour Regimes and Global Production, edited by Neil Martin Coe, Elena Baglioni, Liam Campling, and Adrian Smith. Agenda Publishing.

Alimahomed-Wilson, Jake (interview by Tatiana Cozzarelli and Maryam Alaniz). 2021. “Amazonification is the Future of Capitalism.” Left Voice, April 4. 

Alimahomed,-Wilson, Jake and Ellen Reese (interview by Jörn Boewe and Johannes Schulten). 2021. “Amazons Kometenhafter Aufstieg ist ein Schlüsselmoment im Globalen Kapitalismus [English translation – “Amazon’s Meteoric Rise is a Key Moment in Global Capitalism.”] Luxemburg Magazine: Social Analysis and Left Practice, March 21. 

Alimahomed-Wilson, Jake. 2021. “Surveillance, Stress, and No Bathrooms: Life as an Amazon Driver.” Labor Notes, February

Alimahomed-Jake, and Ellen Reese. 2020. “Amazon Capitalism: How COVID-19 and Racism Made the World’s Most Powerful Corporation.” Pluto Press Blog. 

Alimahomed-Wilson, Jake. 2020. “Building its Own Delivery Network, Amazon Puts the Squeeze on Drivers.Labor Notes, December 17

Alimahomed-Wilson, Jake and Ellen Reese (eds.). 2020. The Cost of Free Shipping: Amazon in the Global Economy. London, UK: Pluto Press.

Alimahomed-Wilson, Jake and Ellen Reese. 2020. “Its A Prime Day for Resistance to Amazon’s Ruthless Exploitation of Its Workers,” October 13. Jacobin

Alimahomed-Wilson, Jake. 2020. “Racialized Masculinities and Global Logistics Labor.” Into the Black Box: Research on Logistics, Spaces, & Labour.

Alimahomed-Wilson, Jake. 2019. “Unfree Shipping: The Racialisation of Logistics Labour.” Work Organization, Labour, & Globalisation, 13(1): 96-13. (WOLG Special Issue: Logistical Gazes – Spaces, Labour, & Struggles in Global Capitalism).